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Developments in Data Centre Hard Drive TCO

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Total Cost of Ownership Graph

The main TCO factors for data centre design

Since social media, data warehousing, online retailing and banking businesses create the most demanding cloud support infrastructures with thousands and thousands of hosts managing petabytes of data, they all understand the significance of crafting an end-to-end storage strategy which appears beyond one time capital cost for the crux of the actual prices – the operating costs related to Total Cost of Ownership (TCO). Cloud architects are creating new guidelines that illustrate the bottom-line value of having a systems wide approach to storage. Usually based on components and software, they deploy drives optimized for special applications that demand efficient power utilization, density and dependability. The important thing: Cloud data centre choices are actually based on value instead of pricing and TCO is how value has been measured.

Embracing the best storage scheme for public, private, and on premise data center infrastructures could make a huge difference in your capacity to significantly lower TCO costs. The key to successfully affecting TCO goes well beyond the price of the drives themselves or measuring effectiveness when it comes to cost per gigabyte only.

Understand the dependability of the hard drives in the data centre. The more dependable the drive, the less time plus price spent keeping it. Drives rated at HGST’s business’s leading standard of 2 million hours Mean-time Between Failure (MTBF) will encounter 40% fewer failures during the five-year life of the drive over these rated at 1.2 million hours.

Raise the density of the present data center footprint with higher-capacity drives. In addition, new up-and-coming helium filled platforms are capable of supporting seven platters per normal 3.5inch HDD, 2 more platters or disks compared to present airfilled five-platter drives.

Power Utilization Efficiency or PUE denotes the proportion of the entire number of power used by a data centre to the power sent or consumed by its own gear. PUE makes it possible to quantify such variables such cooling, electricity distribution and light. The perfect PUE ratio is 1.

Best-in-group data centres like Google and eBay have reported ratios only 1.14 and 1.35, respectively, however an average data centre has a ratio of 2.5. This implies that a typical data centre uses 2-and-a-half times more electricity compared to the amount required to operate the equipment.

Written by Betty

December 3rd, 2013 at 12:33 pm